Protected Utility engagement model

The Protected Utility engagement model outlines how customer agencies access the DTA Protected Utility Program, and how agencies can maximise the use of the blueprint for modern desktop services. A downloadable visual of the Engagement model is available for use.

The Model has five approximate stages. These stages are fluid and may happen concurrently or in cycles:

  1. Engagement
  2. Discovery
  3. Deploy
  4. Transition
  5. Adoption and evaluation

This model contains suggestions, tools, templates and guidance for successfully adopting the Blueprint. It is not intended to be a prescriptive, ‘tick the box’, or one-size-fits all model. Instead, it is intended for agencies to use as required and adapt to their business needs and modernisation journey.

Design principles

The engagement model is designed in accordance with the following principles:

  1. Best practice: the model is based on the American Association of Change Management Professionals’ Change Management Standard, as well as applied experience in business analysis, technology and change.
  2. Clear: roles, activities, and steps are simply described.
  3. Ownership is with the customer, supported by DTA: each customer owns its own objectives and technology environment, while the DTA seeks to guide and partner with organisations.
  4. Understand related work: understand and link existing people, process and technology initiatives to the process model, so it is relevant and not developed in a vacuum.
  5. Executive-championed: the model must be understood and agreed on by relevant senior executives within DTA and the customer agency.
  6. Flexible and non-prescriptive: each initiative in the model is flexible, with several optional and essential steps, which the customer and DTA can use as required. This enables the model to be used as required by the agency.

1. Engagement

During engagement, the customer agency reviews the blueprint, understanding the general overview, benefits, and what it offers them. The customer may register an account on the Community Portal. The customer then reaches out to the DTA to understand what the blueprint can offer, and what is required to use it.

2. Discovery

During discovery, the customer and the DTA, guided by a strategy partner vendor, work together to understand the agency’s business and technical environment, understand its mission and strategy, work to mitigate any adoption risks, and understand drivers and blockers to using M365. The DTA funds Discovery.

3. Deploy

During deploy, the customer implements Microsoft Office 365. Often, a vendor (a technology partner or systems integrator) is required to assist the customer through this process. A second approach to market may be required to procure technical and organisational change management (OCM) services to accomplish the transition.

4. Transition

During transition, agencies adopt the business change required to work in a modern, secure M365 desktop environment. Benefits are realised iteratively, and the necessary improvements are made to enable this. This includes adapting the business processes to suit the new technology landscape. The customer is independent, empowered, and able to drive its own outcomes. Technology support is provided by the vendor. Lessons learnt and knowledge are shared through a WoG community of practice led by the DTA. Transition can happen before or after Deploy (product management). The transition phase may also be implemented iteratively, alongside Deploy. The DTA may co-fund transition activities with agencies.

5. Adoption and evaluation

During adoption and evaluation, the customer agency consumes modern desktop services. Additionally, the customer shares lessons learnt, asks questions of the community, and seeks to understand what worked well and what didn’t. These lessons learnt are harvested through surveys, community discussions, and workshops with the DTA. This improves best practice across WoG.

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